fitness / gym · March 25, 2022 0

Strength in Sports


Muscular strength is the physical ability of a person to overcome or resist resistance through muscular tension. To better understand the concept of force, it is worth returning to the first and third laws of dynamics.

The first law of dynamics states that things remain in their state as long as there is no force acting on them that changes them. To move something that is stationary, we must apply a force to it and do the same if we want to stop it when it is in motion.
The third law of dynamics states that for every force there is an equal force of the opposite sign. So we see that forces act in pairs; one opposes the other, like an airplane taking off against the wind. Both the airplane and the wind exert force, although the force of one is opposed to the force of the other.
Strength training occupies an important place in any type of athletic training. A personal trainer who neglects strength when designing a program is doomed to fail, no matter what his goal is.
Because skeletal muscles are the primary site of lactic acid excretion during and at the end of training, endurance development depends not only on improving respiratory capacity, but also on increasing strength and oxidative capacity.
For example, a runner with inadequate postural and stabilizing muscle strength is an athlete with a lower chance of success, prone to premature exhaustion or injury, regardless of the efficiency of his cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

It is important to remember that the term “strength” can be understood in different ways, depending on the goal: Strength training can range from Olympic weightlifting. Whereas weight training is constant, our strength depends on the mass we want to lift, whether for aesthetic purposes, for health (fitness), to supplement and optimize athletic training, or for rehabilitation.
Strength in Sports
Muscular strength is a person’s physical ability to overcome or resist resistance through muscular tension. To better understand the concept of force, it is worth going back to the first and third laws of dynamics.

The first law of dynamics states that things remain in their state as long as there is no force acting on them that changes them. To move something that is stationary, we must apply a force to it and do the same if we want to stop it when it is in motion.
The third law of dynamics states that for every force there is an equal force of the opposite sign. So we see that forces act in pairs; one opposes the other, like an airplane taking off against the wind. Both the airplane and the wind exert force, although the force of one is opposed to the force of the other.
Strength training occupies an important place in any type of athletic training. A personal trainer who neglects strength when designing a program is doomed to fail, no matter what his goal is.
Because skeletal muscles are the primary site of lactic acid excretion during and at the end of training, endurance development depends not only on improving respiratory capacity, but also on increasing strength and oxidative capacity.
For example, a runner with inadequate postural and stabilizing muscle strength is an athlete with a lower chance of success, prone to premature exhaustion or injury, regardless of the efficiency of his cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

It is important to remember that the term “strength” can be understood in different ways, depending on the goal: Strength training can range from Olympic weightlifting. If weight training is constant, our strength depends on the mass we want to lift, whether for aesthetic purposes, for health (fitness), to supplement and optimize athletic training, or for rehabilitation.